What Is Saori?

Saori weaving is a freeform style of weaving developed in Japan by Misao Jo about 50 years ago.
Photo courtesy of Sampling
Saori woven wrap
 
Saori emphasizes color and texture and weaving your heart, as opposed to weaving traditional patterns.
Saori mobius scarf
Saori is often referred to as a “no mistakes” style of weaving, because these unintentional differences are considered part of the overall art of the piece and are celebrated.
Saori is often referred to as a “no mistakes” style of weaving, because these unintentional differences are considered part of the overall art of the piece and are celebrated.

The philosophy of Saori is based on four guidelines:

Be unique!

Consider the differences between a machine and a human being

We are not trying to make items that could be woven by a machine. We are making unique items that only we, on this day, could make.
Be bold!

Be bold and adventurous

Have the courage to break away from the “normal” and allow yourself the freedom to play.
Find beauty in everything!

Look out through eyes that shine

Expect to find beauty in everything, and that same beauty will be reflected in what you make.
Inspire each other!

Inspire one another, and everyone in the group

Sharing new ideas with others allows you both to grow in your Saori exploration. It can be difficult to step outside of your box when you are weaving on your own, but with inspiration and encouragement from others, we all grow creatively.

An Individualized Learning Experience

The Saori style of teaching is not typically done in a structured curriculum-type of environment. Each student is on their own path and is taught accordingly.

Class time allows plenty of time for experimentation while providing a guide to assist you or make suggestions along your journey. Students are encouraged to develop their own individuality and to feel comfortable expressing themselves through their weaving.

Individualized learning experiences at Handmade Saori Weaving Studio

In Saori, We Often “Weave Without Intent”

You are not weaving a vest, a purse, or even clothing. You are weaving a piece of cloth. When the cloth comes off the loom and has been finished (washed), it can then help you to decide what it wants to become.

If you weave for a particular purpose, then your creativity is limited by that purpose. Weaving without intent allows you to freely express yourself and typically results in more amazing finished items.

Saori fabric made into a jacket

Want to Learn More? Try a Class!

In your first class we will work on techniques to add interest to your weaving, and you will go home with what you wove that day!
Sign Up For a Class Today!
Get All the Latest News!

Get All the Latest News!

Join our mailing list to receive the latest news and updates from our studio. We typically only send one newsletter type email per month and may occasionally send an email related to a special event.

You have Successfully Subscribed!

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This